Comcast signs on 5 more machineQ customers

Comcast IoT division MachineQ
Just as it did in March, Comcast revealed a range of new customers that span the service spectrum for the typical smart city. (Comcast)

Trying to keep up the publicity on its enterprise IoT operation—with some success—Comcast on Tuesday announced five additional clients for its machineQ unit. 

Just as it did with a similar announcement in March, Comcast revealed a range of new customers that span the service spectrum for the typical smart city. 

There’s Massachusetts-based asset tracking company FAIRWAYiQ, which provides real-time monitoring and management of motorized equipment and labor productivity for venues including golf courses, sports stadiums, municipalities and universities.

H2O Degree provides wireless sub-metering products for multifamily dwellings and commercial facilities. 

RELATED: Comcast announces 5 new machineQ clients

Massachusetts-based SteamIQ provides real time performance data on the performance of stream traps, leveraging the machineQ LoRaWAN network. 

Seco Sys makes HydraCommunity, a platform used by mining operations, campuses and utilities to manage watger. 

And finally, California-based Vinduino helps agricultural organization, like vineyards, more efficiently manage water. 

“We’re helping break down barriers to entry for B2B-focused IoT solution providers because our cloud-based, scalable and secure IoT hardware and software solutions have the ability to extract device data from hard to reach locations with low power requirements – that traditional wireless connectivity options can’t offer,” said Alex Khorram, general manager of machineQ, in a statement. “These qualities, are opening up a whole new world of use cases and vertical industries for our customers, leading to new market opportunities and helping them to quickly scale their business to meet their customers’ demands.”

For Comcast, machineQ still appears to be a pretty nascent business, despite all the new customer activity. 

For example, the IoT division wasn’t even mentioned during Comcast’s annual shareholders meeting two weeks ago. 

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