Comcast expands X1 syndication empire, enlists Canada’s Videotron

Comcast Xfinity X1 set top box

Videotron has become the latest Canadian cable operator to license the X1 video platform from Comcast, joining Rogers Communications and Shaw Communications. 

The Montreal-based operator said it will create an IPTV service based on the Comcast platform, which is widely credited for turning the tide on what had been rampant Comcast pay-TV customer losses over the last decade. 

“We are very pleased with our decision to choose this state-of-the-art platform,” said Manon Brouillette, president and CEO of Videotron, in a statement. “Combined with the power of Videotron’s network and its rich array of content, it will enable us to continue offering our customers the best possible experience and will strengthen our technology leadership.”

RELATED: Comcast’s licensed X1 producing mixed churn results for Cox, Shaw early on

Comcast is not revealing how much it’s making through syndicating white-label versions of X1. The operator is also syndicating its home automation and security products.

Currently in the early phase of its rollout of the white-label X1, which it brands as “Contour,” privately held Cox Communications has yet to reveal marked reductions in video customer churn, according to analysts’ estimates. 

However, in June, Shaw attributed an improvement in pay-TV customer metrics during its fiscal third quarter to BlueSky TV, its version of X1. The company added 13,000 customers to its consumer cable video ranks, the first time it experienced growth in that area since 2010.

“BlueSky is more than just a new set-top box or voice remote. BlueSky TV is a revolutionary TV viewing experience that listens, learns, and curates preferred content through an intuitive and modern interface leveraging the power of voice,” said Shaw CEO Brad Shaw during a call with investors. 

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