Cox tops Netflix's rankings; Google turns into Alphabet

More cable news from across the Web:

> Google has restructured its operations under the new corporate moniker Alphabet. Washington Post article

> Cox Communications scored the top rank on Netflix's speed rankings. Post

> NBC Sports Group re-upped its deal with the English Premier League. Deadline article

> Patrick Drahi was successful in his effort to move control of Altice to the Netherlands, which is part of his efforts to expand his reach across the world. WSJ article

> Starz is showing all the episodes of two new original series, Da Vinci's Demons and Flesh and Bone, on its Starz Play TV everywhere app before they premiere on cable. Multichannel News article

Mobile Developer News

> NetEase is offering up to $500,000 to mobile game developers. Hot Seat

> Apple TV could create challenges for mobile app developers. Editor's Corner

Telecom News

> Verizon Communications tested next-generation passive optical (NG-PON2)  fiber-to-the-premises technology from a central office in Framingham, Mass., to a FiOS customer's home three miles away and to a local business. Article

Wireless News

> Tucows CEO Elliott Noss said that his company's Ting Mobile MVNO has worked through most of the problems it had in terms of customer service as a result of changes Sprint made to its rules for devices that customers want to take to MVNOs. Article

> Sprint wholesale partner Shenandoah Telecommunications, better known as Shentel, is buying fellow Sprint wholesale partner nTelos Wireless in a deal valued at around $640 million, including net debt. Article

And finally… Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr filed a brief with the MPAA in the battle against MovieTube sites. Article

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