IPTV at center of GVT-EchoStar venture in Brazil

EchoStar and Vivendi subsidiary GVT are combining resources in a proposed pay TV joint venture in Brazil that would leverage GVT's IP network and EchoStar's satellite and video technology expertise.

The two companies, in a joint press release, said the venture will be headquartered in Brazil, managed by GVT and take advantage of GVT"s "strong market position and state-of-the-art IP network combined with EchoStar expertise in satellite and video technology and its Brazilian licenses."

Combined, the two companies said they planned a national IPTV service along with "unique high power satellite" once the appropriate definitive agreements and corporate and governmental approvals are reached.

The joint venture is especially counting on the high demand that will be created in Brazil by the FIFA World Cup in 2014 and Olympic Games in 2016.

GVT will certainly provide a solid base of operations and more than 500,000 households that already subscribe to its IPTV service. The company operates in 146 Brazilian cities nationwide with pay TV services that use hybrid technology to combine satellite TV signals with interactive services via a terrestrial network.

EchoStar's expertise comes from its wholly owned Hughes satellite broadband services subsidiary and Sling Media's Slingbox products. The Englewood, Colo.-based firm also offers a line of set-top boxes for free to air satellite and terrestrial markets.

For more:
- GVT and EchoStar issued this press release

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