Mobile-centric group backs spectrum reallocation legislation

A mobile-centric group of companies calling itself the High Tech Spectrum Coalition (HTSC) supports federal legislation that would auction and reallocate wireless spectrum and reward broadcasters with a percentage of the proceeds, according to a letter provided to FierceCable by Congressman Robert Latta's office.

"We strongly believe that that voluntary incentive auctions are the best near term mechanism to ensure there is sufficient spectrum to satisfy the growing demand for wireless services," the group, composed of Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE: ALU), Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL), Cisco (Nasdaq: CSCO), Ericsson, Intel (Nasdaq: INTC), Nokia, RIM, Qualcomm, the Information Technology Industry Council, TIA and Semiconductor Industry Association wrote to Latta, author of H.R. 1622, also known as the Spectrum Innovation Act.

The legislation notes that it is in the "public interest" for broadcasters to voluntarily relinquish "some or all ... licensed spectrum usage rights" for new assignments in broadband wireless and share in any revenues from these voluntary auctions. Importantly, for broadcasters at least, the legislation also states that the FCC "may not reclaim frequencies of broadcast television licensees directly or indirectly on an involuntary basis."

For more:
- see the proposed legislation (PDF)

Related articles:
FCC, NAB tangle over broadcast spectrum auctions
NCTA to FCC: Don't change must-carry as part of spectrum grab
CBS won't be giving up its spectrum to the FCC and wireless
Broadcasters' spectrum crisis could end up being cable's problem

Suggested Articles

A massive media conglomerate like Comcast/NBCUniversal makes news often but this week was particularly busy with an acquisition, a big name reveal and a major…

DAZN, a subscription sports streaming service that launched in 2018, has a new distribution deal in place on Comcast’s X1 and Flex video platforms.

Given the accelerating rate at which consumers are going online for entertainment, Roku said that streaming TV viewers could surpass the amount of pay TV…