NFL extends online exposure

A slew of traditional TV programmers have recently spilled content onto the Internet, including the National Football League. The NFL, which guards its content closely, is making the Sunday Ticket package on DirecTV available online in a SuperFan pack that costs $99 on top of the regular $269 TV fee.

Other networks taking shows online include B-movie cabler Starz Media, which is offering a platform for Japanese anime dubbed "Manga Ambitions," David Kaplan reports at PaidContent.org. Viacom is also said to be siphoning exclusive material from Comedy Central's "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" to Yahoo!, perhaps to show YouTube who's boss. Yahoo! also has NFL streaming rights, mostly for areas outside of the United States. The major broadcast networks also have online video plans percolating, including NewCo, the joint project of NBC and Fox parent, News Corp.

The strategy for preventing online TV from cannibalizing legacy distribution appears to be something along the lines of, "TV will eat itself."

For More:
- Eric Bangeman reports on the NFL Superfan package for ars technica here
- David Kaplan reports on various online TV endeavors here

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