Suddenlink inks deals with CBS, Diddy's Revolt, but no update on pending Viacom blackout

Grinding through a busy negotiating period for program rights, Suddenlink has announced a broad-reaching renewal deal with CBS Corp. that includes retrans rights for CBS owned-and-operated stations, as well as carriage of cable assets CBS Sports Network and, for the first time, the Smithsonian Network.

The deal comes a day after the St. Louis-based MSO announced a smaller deal to carry hip-hop impresario Sean Combs' Revolt TV channel, which will join Suddenlink program guides starting Wednesday, Oct. 1.

However, Suddenlink, which has threatened to pull Viacom channels off the air that same day, has yet to announce an affiliate renewal deal with the conglomerate.

"CBS continues to deliver quality programming, and our customers indicate they enjoy its top-rated shows, news, and sports," said Kathy Payne, Suddenlink senior VP and chief programming officer, in a statement.

"We are pleased to have reached this agreement that recognizes the value of the quality programming across our portfolio which includes not only the CBS Television Network but also CBS Sports Network and for the first time on Suddenlink's systems, Smithsonian Channel," added Ray Hopkins, president, television networks distribution for CBS. "Suddenlink offers a terrific proposition for its consumers; we look forward to continuing and expanding our relationship with them."

For more:
- read this Suddenlink press release

Related links:
Suddenlink threatens blackout of Viacom channels
Cable One preps replacements for Viacom channels
Viacom to deliver channels to Sony's new OTT service
Viacom-Cablevision antitrust battle escalates with fraud allegations

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