TV Everywhere use surges: authenticated viewing jumped 388% in Q2, Adobe says

Buoyed by a flurry of high-usage global sports events, TV Everywhere viewing surged in the second quarter, with Adobe measuring a 388 percent uptick in authenticated online video watching over Q2 2013.

According to Adobe's bi-annual Video Benchmark Report, multiscreen usage surged during periods with big sports events, such as the Sochi Winter Olympics, March's NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament and the summer's World Cup.

Pay-TV users, on average, authenticated 31 percent more sports events, 4.2 game and matches per month, compared to a year earlier. Authenticated episodic TV content, however, experienced a bigger bump, jumping 81 percent to 5.6 shows per month.

More online video is now being viewed in the living room via over-the-top boxes and videogame devices, as well as mobile via smart phones and tablets. Adobe says "browser-based access"--e.g., watching on notebook and desktop computers--shrank a whopping 41 percent year over year. Usage on gaming consoles and OTT devices, meanwhile, shot up 194 percent.

Video usage on Android devices was up 28 percent.

Adobe digital benchmark

Authenticated online TV growth hit 388 percent year-over-year in Q2. (Source: U.S. Digital Video Benchmark Report, Adobe Digital Index)

For more:
- read this Adobe report
- read this Broadcasting & Cable story

Related links:
Four reasons why TV Everywhere isn't ready for prime time: A simple look at a complex problem
Analyst describes 'torturous' TV Everywhere experience watching FX's 'The Americans'
High court does what TV Everywhere failed to do: stop Aereo
TV Everywhere's Paleolithic rollout continues: Showtime Anytime now on Xbox 360
ESPN, Univision generate record TV Everywhere audience, experience glitches

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