NASA launches video library to public, adds video app for Amazon Fire TV

NASA
NASA's new video and image library consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location containing more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files. (IBC)

NASA has launched a library that will allow the public to search for and download video, audio and images.

The agency says its new video and image library consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location containing more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files. The site will allow for embedding and for downloading in various resolutions.

The site will also automatically scale the interface for mobile phones and tablets; and display the EXIF/camera data that includes exposure, lens used, and other information, when available.

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NASA is expecting the library’s API will automate uploads for the agency. The site will be run on NASA's cloud native "infrastructure-as-a-code" technology enabling on-demand use in the cloud.

NASA warns the library doesn’t contain everything, but “rather provides the best of what NASA makes publicly available from a single point of presence on the web.” The agency promises that new and archival images, video and audio files continually will be added over time.

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At the same time, NASA announced the release of its video app for Amazon Fire TV after previously releasing the app for iOS, Android and Apple TV devices.

"With the NASA app, the public can browse NASA's amazing discoveries directly from their personal devices," said Bob Jacobs, the deputy associate administrator for communications at NASA, in a statement. "Today, users with Amazon Fire TV and other services can explore NASA's wealth of images, videos and more on their home televisions."

The app offers livestreaming NASA Television, a real-time view of Earth from the International Space Station, more than 16,000 images, and more than 14,000 on-demand NASA videos.

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