Fiksu launches self-serve demand-side advertising platform

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Fiksu uses real-time bidding exchanges to assemble its dataset that marketers can use to targeting audiences. (iStock)

Fiksu, a demand-side platform (DSP) for digital advertising, has launched a self-serve DSP that will give marketers more control over their ad campaigns.

Marketers using Fiksu’s platform can now access inventory and deliver ads to connected TVs. The company is also promising its self-serve DSP clients will recieve detailed reporting and campaign optimization tools. Keys metrics include total viewability time, video completion rate (VCR) and view-through rate (VTR). The company will also offer customized reports on impressions and total spend.

Fiksu DSP is also working with Pixalate to mitigate fraudulent ad impressions by analyzing device usage to identify suspicious activity before ad budgets are spent.

“Our experience in business along with knowledge gained from current industry researches and user feedback allows us to identify market demand and implement practical tools that meet it. We foresee more and more advertisers seeking ultimate control over their campaigns, so we launched the Fiksu self-serve DSP to provide them with a high level of autonomy and transparency,” said Anna Kuzmenko, COO at Fiksu, in a statement.

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Fiksu uses real-time bidding exchanges to assemble its dataset that marketers can use to targeting audiences. The company – which is based in Boston – has clients including Amazon, Disney, Groupon, Coca-Cola, Electronic Arts, Dunkin’ Donuts and Starcom.

Fiksu is building out the features and functions of its DSP as major media companies are making acquisitions to solidify to space in the demand-side advertising space. Late last year Roku acquired Dataxu for $150 million and in 2018 AT&T acquired AppNexus for a reported $1.6 billion.

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