Sony Crackle taps Nielsen’s cloud for addressable ads

Crackle logo (Crackle)

Sony Pictures Television’s Crackle, an ad-supported video-on-demand service, is going with Nielsen Marketing Cloud for addressable ads across mobile, connected TVs, streaming boxes and game consoles.

Crackle’s marketers will get access to Nielsen’s cross-segment data for targeting ads on the service as well as the Sony Crackle Plus Network that includes Funimation and Sony Pictures Television Mobile Games

“Nielsen and Sony Crackle are working together to shape the future of TV,” said Rene Santaella, senior vice president of operations and business planning at Sony Pictures Television, in a statement. “We are also very excited to bring connected television to the forefront of the advertising ecosystem and bridge the gap of addressability with highly coveted ‘console-first’ and psychographic streaming segments in the new living room. This is great for improving our clients’ campaign performance and creates entirely new reach opportunities for them.”

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“We are thrilled to be leading the charge in next generation television with Sony Crackle. Nielsen Marketing Cloud will help deliver better advertising experiences for its audiences no matter what device they are on,” said Nielsen executive vice president Damian Garbaccio in the statement. “Sony Crackle will be able to more effectively monetize its advertising inventory and acquire new customers by improving the cross-screen advertising experience across its content. It’s great for advertisers, and it’s even better for consumers.”

Crackle is available on Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast and Roku; Android and iOS devices; LG, Samsung, Sony and Vizio smart TVs; and PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360 and Xbox One consoles.

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